The Manifesto of Hard

It’s too difficult… I don’t think I can.

Those are words frequently spoken moments before a breakthrough happens and a transformative event takes place. Those words are uttered just before the person saying them achieves a new level in life, business, or whatever.

Things Are Hard

Things are hard. Every time we turn around, we’re faced with some difficulty or challenge — a seemingly insurmountable conundrum that threatens to push us backwards.

I’m talking here of everything in life. From the moment we enter the world until the moment we leave it, we’re faced with difficulties:

As babies, life should be simple because they really only do a couple of things (eat, sleep, and other less-adorable things) but those are hard for babies because they don’t always get the things they want and can’t easily communicate the problem. So there’s lots of crying.

As toddlers, life continues to be difficult. We’re learning to walk and eat and share and don’t reach over and smack someone else. Each of these things is achieved with a great degree of difficulty. (Have you ever seen a kid learning to walk? Yes, they’re proud of themselves when they finally get it but I’ve seen drunk people with better balance).

As children, we continue to face hardship. Going to school was hard. Making friends was hard, and so was losing those friends. Being bullied was hard. Learning to ride a bike was hard. All of those things are hard.

As teens, life doesn’t get easier. The challenges of life get even more difficult when you mix in puberty, romance, learning to drive, going to high school, preparing for college.

As adults, life continues to be hard. We’ve got bills to pay, kids to feed, managers to appease, aging parents to think about, and our own retirement that constantly marches toward us.

… And these are just the hardships we face when things are going fine. Mix in health problems, emergencies, job changes, social and economic uncertainty, and suddenly the hard things just got harder.

Yes, we do find joy in these times but there are many difficult things we face in life. It’s like a pendulum, with each extreme side of the pendulum as some kind of hardship while the center point of the pendulum is the brief period of respite when we can exhale for a moment of peace before things turn chaotic again.

The Problem With Hard Things

As kids, we had little choice; we had to face those hardships because we wanted to grow up. So we suffered the incredible challenges of learning to walk or going to school or learning to ride a bike or learning to drive.

But as adults, when we finally gain control of our lives (as much as is possible), we try to keep that pendulum from swinging too far to either extreme. We do whatever we can to keep the pendulum close to the center — close to the easiness.

This sounds good, doesn’t it? At the end of a very long day, when the kids have finally gone to bed, there is nothing easier than flaking out in front of the TV for a few minutes with a bag of chips, just to lose yourself in the story of whatever happens to be on. You’ve got an hour or two of this before you have to get up again tomorrow and do it all over again.

I think this is a problem.

I assert that hard is good, and the more challenge we accept in life, the better we are because of it. I also assert that there is a grave danger in trying to keep the pendulum from swinging too far from the center.

Too often we try to keep ourselves in that comfort zone, trying to strike a delicate balance between daily hardships.

I’m not just talking about kicking back in front of the TV. I’m talking about taking fewer chances with anything in life.

I frequently meet people who are dissatisfied in their jobs and want to quit; however, their desire for the default “ease” of a predictable life far outweighs their desire to leave their job, so the end up accepting the small daily hardship of their job instead of the hardship that comes with leaving.

I see it in business, too: People want to take the fast-track; the easy route. They want the reward without the hard work.

The most successful people in any endeavor are the ones who learn to accept, anticipate, and embrace the hardship required.

Why Things Should Be Hard

Things should be hard.

  1. Hard things are a filter that keeps most people out and lets only a few people through.
  2. Hard things are our “tuition” to a priceless education.
  3. Hard things are the price we pay for the rewards.
  4. Hard things define us.

Hard things are a filter that keeps most people out and lets only a few people through.

Hard things are our “tuition” to a priceless education.

Hard things are the price we pay for the rewards.

Hard things define us.

One more reason why things should be hard …

Hard Things Are A Guide

Hard things are a guide for us showing us the road less traveled… the road that may lead to greater success simply because too many other people took the easier path.

For that reason, we should think about running toward hardship… toward the hard challenges… toward difficulty… and embrace the struggle of challenging effort to sharpen us.

Hard things are a beacon, beckoning us away from the path of least resistance and tempting the right people (not everyone, just a few) to reach for more and to grasp it.

How To Embrace The Hard Work

  1. Prepare… but don’t prepare everything
  2. Get curious and learn as you go
  3. Embrace change
  4. Get comfortable with calculated risks
  5. Break everything down into the simplest possible controllable actions
  6. Get inspired
  7. Work tirelessly
  8. Become the person who rises to the challenge
  9. Lean on others
  10. Accept the challenge
  11. Sacrifice
  12. Love finding problems (and solutions)
  13. Make it easier
  14. Make it harder
  15. Get creative
  16. Don’t ever stop
  17. Recognize difficulty
  18. Perseverance
  19. Take risks
  20. Find joy in chaos
  21. Find joy in prevailing
  22. Feel alive
  23. Contingencies
  24. Set big goals
  25. Stretch and break your assumptions
  26. Don’t hold back
  27. Push yourself
  28. Double down
  29. Celebrate and then move on
  30. Chase down hardship

What’s Hard For You?

I love the saying, “If it were easy, everyone would be doing it.” As a business owner who works with other business owners, I see that saying proved true again and again and again.

Lately it’s made me rethink my work and leisure time, to redefine what I find enjoyable, and to intentionally choose hard things that challenge me.

A few examples from my life and business just in the past year:

  • Expanding my real estate portfolio outside of my comfort zone
  • Pushing my physical limits in various challenges (like when I rappelled down the side of a 22-storey building or learned to rock climb)
  • I expanded my one-person copywriting business into an almost full-blown agency
  • I raised my prices again… and again… and again
  • I cleared out my client list dramatically
  • I said yes to several opportunities that will stretch me even though I haven’t figured out how to make them happen yet

Chasing and embracing hardship has a decisive factor in pushing me to the next level.

What’s hard for you? Maybe that’s the key to your next level.

Time Tracking: One Of The Best Strategies For Increased Productivity

Want to give yourself a raise?

I can’t think of a faster, simpler way to get more done and make more money than to do this:

Track your time.

Yeah, that’s it.

It’s one of those no-brainer so-simple-nobody-does-it strategies to get more done in the day. Every single day.

It works because, well, we tell ourselves lies about our productivity. We think we’re being productive but we’re rarely as productive as we think we are. (I’m not suggesting we need to run at 100% capacity, 100% of the time. Actually, I think that’s a recipe for burnout… that said, I think most of us have a lot more capacity than we realize because we convince ourselves that we’re maxed out when we’re really not.)

I love time tracking and I try to do it every week. It’s always valuable.

Let me show you how I do it…

(spoiler alert: I’m old school; I realize there is software or mobile apps for this stuff but I find it too easy to minimize them on my desktop or forget to run them (and some tracking software I’ve used in the past has been an absolute resource hog). I like pen and paper and a couple of highlighters. Keep it simple and it’s always in my face.)

On Sunday I draw out my week in 15 minute increments…

Aaron Hoos - Time Tracking

Whenever I recommend this practice to other people, I always recommend that they do it in 15 minute increments. Believe me, I’ve tried 30… and 60… but they suck. They just aren’t as good at giving you a very clear picture of how you spend your time. It’s far easier to look back at an hour-long segment of time and think “I was productive this hour” when in reality you were productive for just a few minutes. But 15 minutes? It’s a good balance between being laser-focused on a small segment of time while still keeping this system manageable. (Hey, I’m not suggesting that you assess every minute, right?)

You’ll notice that I track from 7:00 AM to 3:00 PM. You can track any time you want but that’s what I like to track.

I prefer to get up early and, ideally, finish all my work before noon. (I used to be a nightowl but you can check out this blog post about how I mastered my sleep to wake up early and become more productive and this series of posts when I challenged myself to wake up at 5:00 AM to get into the habit of waking up early).

My absolute best time for maximum productivity is 7:00 AM through about 10:30 AM. I get a lot of great work done then. I keep tracking past noon because I enjoy the process and the early afternoon is still good productive time to work on my biz.

I measure my time in terms of simple green for revenue-generating work and red for non-revenue-generating work. Yeah, it’s not a perfect system since prospect calls or marketing of my own business might be colored red but still be important to do. But you have to pick something and right now I’m focused on building a business that generates more revenue so that’s what I’ve chosen. In a different situation I may measure in some other way. (There was a time, for example, when I would have colored green only for when I was typing words but now that I also bill for other things like consulting, I needed to adjust what I measured.)

Time Tracking — April 16-20

Monday, April 16


So, on Monday I woke up and jumped into my work. It was a pretty good day! I’d give myself a grade of “A” for Monday’s level of focus and productivity. There were a couple of times when I paused for some fun/mental-break/social diversions but that’s okay because those little breaks were like breathers that could keep me focused the rest of the time. My goal isn’t to get rid of all stuff marked in red; it’s just to be aware of it and make sure it doesn’t take over.

Disclaimer: don’t bother trying to read my handwriting. It’s messy. I basically just jot down a quick note about what I do so I can look back and what I did during various blocks of time.

Tuesday, April 17

Aaron Hoos - Time Tracking
Tuesday was a completely different story than Monday. I’ll give it a grade of “C”. The day was a gong-show right from the very first moment. I was in reactive mode, dealing with challenges and trying to solve problems. There were some technical issues. And on top of that I had a few things I felt that I needed to work on that weren’t revenue-generating but still needed to be done.

Fortunately, I feel like I turned the ship around by 11:00 AM and was able to get in some revenue-generating writing for the last few measured hours of my day.

Wednesday, April 18

Aaron Hoos - Time Tracking
Wednesday was better than Tuesday but not as good as Monday. I’d give it a grade of “B”. I got some work done and although I did have a non-revenue-generating meeting (actually, it was a few short back-to-back calls that were all related) I still got some good work done overall.

Thursday, April 19

Forgot to take a picture after Thursday was done, so you’re seeing a bit of Friday in there too.
Aaron Hoos - Time Tracking
Thursday was decent too. I’d give it the grade of “B-” as it was close to Wednesday but not quite there. I did move a bunch of projects forward although I didn’t get to cross as many off as I would have liked.

Friday, April 20

Aaron Hoos - Time Tracking
Friday was another day I’d grade as “A”; a strong finish to the week. I was focused and productive and got a lot of good work done before a quick lunch, and that meant I could enjoy the afternoon at a local book sale. So, a good day, overall!

Assessment

Tracking tracking is a good practice to do but it’s even better when you pause at the end of the week to learn some lessons.

Here are some lessons I learned this week, along with a few reminders that you might find interesting if this is new to you…

1. There is value in the simplicity of the only-2-colors format. However, some of the red-colored spots are still critical to running my business (such as the meeting on Wednesday morning). So red doesn’t mean bad… I just want to be aware and control it.

2. Planning the night before (especially outlining the content I want to write) helps me stay focused and at a higher level of productivity.

3. It’s all in how I start: If I start strong, I can usually keep going and bounce back from interruptions easily. If I start from a reactive trouble-shooting mode, as was the case on Tuesday, it takes a ton of effort to get on track.

4. It’s hard to predict when things go off the rails. And since I can’t always anticipate when that will happen, I need to become better at deciding what is worth my attention when it does. In retrospect, I could have saved some of that problem-solving stuff for after 3pm (when I stop tracking my time for the day).

5. When my mornings are mostly green (what I’d grade as “A” or “B” days) I can usually finish everything I wanted to do by lunch… and then everything I do after that is extra income (if I choose to work) or free time (if I choose). Therefore, I have more freedom and choice after lunch if I can create stronger starts and maintain more consistent focus in the morning.

6. I try to do this tracking every week, which is a great practice but I’ve observed htat the level of accountability that comes from sharing this on Facebook was remarkably good at keeping me even more focused and productive! Not sure I want to share all these details of my life so publicly every week but I think there is value in sharing this a bit more regularly. Will think more on this!

Summary

If you bill for your time or based on a certain amount or type of productivity (such as word count), time tracking is the most effective way to become more productive (and give yourself a raise). It cuts through the lies that you tell yourself about productivity and reveals what you truly do at any given moment of your day.

There are always ways to become more productive and efficient, and a million books have been written about every method and strategy out there. But I haven’t found anything more effective than simply using time tracking to get a handle on what you do each day…

… and then taking a few moments at the end of the week to assess how you did, to learn some lessons, and to aim for something better next week.

The War Within: Here’s The Mindset Shift To Improve Any Aspect Of Your Life And Business


It’s 5:00 in the morning. My alarm goes off and I drowsily open one eye just long enough to turn off the alarm and go back to sleep.

I’d wanted to get up in the morning to jog but I’m sleepy and I can hear a cold winter wind outside. So I stay in my bed and sleep longer.

It’s not that I needed the sleep. Rather, it’s that that the comparison between the effort and cold of a winter morning jog compared to the comfort and warmth of my bed is a battle that is hard to win.

Actually, that’s not the real battle happening.

There’s a war going on inside my mind every morning.

… and every moment of the day.

Oh, and it’s happening in your mind, too, as well as the minds of every other person at each moment of each person’s day. In any and every area of your life and business, this is happening… in your health, your financial situation, your relationships, your hobbies, your professional life, your education, and in everything else as well.

The War Within

Let’s skip the really violent imagery and say that’s a tug-of-war. In my mind and yours. Every millisecond of the day.

It’s a tug of war between two people: On the one side is the person you were and on the other side is the person you want to be.

  • The person you were—this person represents stagnation and remaining idle in your comfort zone. This person fears change. This person believes that self preservation is the key to enjoying life, and they’re convinced that you can get by simply by doing things the way they’ve always been done.
  • The person you want to be—this person represents growth and challenge, which occurs outside of your comfort zone. This person acknowledges that growth can mean risk. This person believes that the key to enjoying life is to stretch yourself farther than you’ve gone in the past, and they’re convinced that only the strong survive.

These two people battle back and forth. Sometimes one wins; sometimes the other wins. In some aspects of your life, one is stronger; in other aspects of your life, the other is stronger.

In my own life, I have no problem working out at 4:30 in the afternoon each day, and it’s the challenge-accepting person that I want to be who dominates to get me off the chair and into my workout gear. But at 5:00 in the morning when the wind is howling outside and I’m tired, the person I was is stronger than the person I want to be, pulling that tug-of-war rope over to the side of comfort.

Think about the things in your life that you want to change. How successful is your change? If you are struggling, the person you were is winning. If you are succeeding at making the change, the person you want to be is winning.

There’s One More Person In This Scenario

There’s a third person in this scenario, too: it’s you, right now at this very moment. And the “right-now-you” is watching this tug-of-war happen between who you were and who you want to be. You’re watching… but you’re also participating, jumping in to help one or the other pull that rope.

You-right-now are deciding whether you want comfort or challenge, stasis or transformation, and you are aiding the person you were or the person you want to be to win in that moment.

And look, not every moment of every day can be devoted to growth. That’s going to be exhausting and difficult on you mentally and physically. And you’re not going to grow in every area at an accelerated pace. And maybe there are areas where you are happy and don’t see a need to grow.

… all fine. But the tug-of-war happens anyway. In every moment; in every area of life.

Here’s How You Can Win

Assuming that you want to grow, and recognizing that it’s not always easy to leap out of bed at 5:00 in the morning when the winter wind is howling, here’s what you can do to step up and lend a hand in the tug-of-war to the person you want to be… to help the person you want to be and to hinder the person you were.

  • Create a reason to push yourself. You might want to make a change in your life but you can’t seem to make it stick. When that happens, think about why you are making the change. Sometimes a change or improvement seems arbitrary, and that makes it a hard habit to stick to. But if the change has a stronger, more meaningful reason then it’s easier to stick to.
  • Get rid of temptations. I’m not much of a snacker but if you are, and if you want to snack less, then you need to get rid of the snacks in your house. All of them. Even the ones you buy for someone else.
  • Turn your change into a habit. Remember earlier I said that I had no problem working out at 4:30 in the afternoon? That wasn’t always the case. It was a struggle. I slowly made it a habit. Now it’s an expected part of my day and it’s locked into my schedule and I actually look forward to it… and feel like I’ve missed something important if I don’t workout one day.
  • Become curious. Curiosity is a powerful and often overlooked tool when it comes to change. Rather than saying, “I’m going to try to do this in my business” (which is a statement), get curious about it and ask yourself, “What will happen when I do this in my business?” When you’re overwhelmed with a big challenge, curiosity helps you to explore that challenge and break it down into a smaller one.
  • Make it fun. Our brains are wired to hate risk. Risk is scary. It’s the fearful step out of the warm and safe cave into the scary unknown. But have you ever lost yourself in a fun activity, only to discover that you’ve far exceeded your comfort zone? Let’s say you want to exercise a bit more but you abhor the thought of going to the gym to run on the treadmill. Well what if you and a few friends just started playing soccer in the evening? You’ll get the workout and barely notice it.
  • Turn it into a short-term challenge. This one is an effective strategy for me. Whenever I’m faced with an out-side-of-my-comfort-zone opportunity to grow, that I cannot seem to consistently complete on my own (such as the winter jog!) then I turn it into a short-term challenge. For example, instead of declaring that I’m going to jog every day, I say that I’m going to jog for 30 days straight and that’s it. By the end of the 30 days, it’s a habit that I love and I can more easily continue doing it but the fact that it’s a challenge makes it more enjoyable in that habit-forming period.

Summary

At any given moment there’s a tug-of-war raging in your mind between the comfort-zone person you were and the risk-tolerant person you want to be. And you right now? You’re in the middle watching it happen and deciding on the fly who you want to help win in that moment.

Stay the same or grow. It’s your choice in this very moment.

How I Leapt Off A 22-Storey Building And Lived To Tell About It

Would you leap off of a 22-storey building?

I did. Specifically, the building in the center of this picture…

Here’s How It Happened…

A few years ago, when I lived in Winnipeg Manitoba, I heard about an event where people raised funds for charity and, as part of the fundraising, they could rappel down one of the skyscrapers downtown. It sounded like SO MUCH FUN!

Unfortunately, I heard about it too late to participate that year. In the years to come I wanted to do it but never had the time or the money or the desire to raise funds all at the same time… then over the years I forgot about it.

Then I moved to Regina Saskatchewan. While searching for fun things to do in the city, and for ways to get involved in a good cause, I stumbled over a website for The Dropzone — the exact event that I had wanted to do in Winnipeg… and it was happening here in Regina too.

The Dropzone is an annual event hosted collaboratively between Easter Seals and the Saskatchewan Abilities Council. Both groups work to help people with disabilities live full and active lives. The Dropzone event happens every year across Canada since 2005 and has raised more than $15 million for this cause.

I signed up and committed to raise the funds to rappel. I was SO excited! Rappelling has been on my bucket list for many years.

Preparation

As a requirement of participating in this event, I had to take some training (makes sense!) and I went in late July. It was held at a safety training company; we learned about the equipment and then rappelled off of a simple 2-storey structure inside a warehouse.

I felt comfortable with the process and the equipment, although the harness was excruciatingly painful and left two very big bruises on my stomach. (I was worried that, if I felt that way during the 2-storey drop, what would it be like during a 22-storey drop! Fortunately, someone identified the problem — the shoulder straps were too loose — and it was fixed for the main drop).

Then, it was a waiting game during which I raised money, waited for the day to come, and took silly pictures like this one…

August 19, 2017

The day of the event finally arrived. I was so excited!

Here I am leaving the house. My game-face is already on!

Aaron Hoos

One disappointment from earlier in the week was that my rappel time was scheduled for between 7:45 and 8:15 in the morning. The whole event is supposed to be a fun and party-like atmosphere that happens in Regina’s bustling downtown core at the same time as a nearby farmers market. I thought the atmosphere would have been very fun but doubted that anyone would be there at 7:45! (Although the early drop time turned out to be a good thing… more on that in a moment).

When I arrived, it was SO quiet downtown. Here’s a picture of me failing to get the perfect selfie in front of the building.

Then I entered the lobby of the building, signed a waiver, and started getting suited up with the harness and helmet and gear. Yes, it’s not lost on me that the helmet would serve no useful purpose if the equipment failed. But safety first, I guess!

Then I took the LOOOOOONG elevator ride up to the 21st floor, signed another waiver (!?!) and then had to climb a ladder onto the roof.

The view was incredible. The building I was on is the tallest in Regina (I think!) so I could see all around. Here’s a selfie of the view. I am excited in this picture but also look silly because the helmet is squeezing my cheeks out to make them look really chubby! haha.

Then, it was time to wait my turn and I got super-focused. Here I am, all ready to go in my gear, with full focus. A couple people tried to talk to me and I probably came across as rude and cold but I was really just getting into the zone.

Finally it was my turn to rappel I approached the edge of the building and my safety rope was tied to the tripod.

Once my safety rope was tied, I had to climb up onto the ledge of the building and then lean out into my harness. The ground below was SO FAR DOWN.

It was the scariest thing I’ve ever done in my life.

I can’t describe how challenging it was to grab hold of the tripod, stand on the edge of the roof, and stick my feet over the building to feel around blindly until I found the ledge… and then I had to lean backward into my harness and trust a rope to hold me.

Here’s a screenshot from the Global News report about the event. I actually look surprisingly calm here but I cannot describe how insanely scary it was to see all those tiny people below!

(You can view the full article and news report at this link, but if you’re looking for me specifically, I appear for one second at about 1:25 into the video. Blink and you’ll miss it.)

I leaned back, gave the photographer a thumb’s up (I’ll post that picture here when they send it to me) and started my descent.

And it was awesome! :)

As soon as I started, the initial fear vanished and was replaced by a rush of adrenaline as I got into the groove. The day was perfect, the view was amazing, and I was doing something that I’d always wanted to do.

Here’s a picture of me very early into my descent. There were two rappellers going at once and I was on the right…

I tried to pause on my descent from time to time to get a good view but that was harder than I thought. I even brought my phone along to get some pictures or do a Facebook Live video but there was no way I could do that because I was wearing gloves and my phone had been tethered to me but was not easy to get to, and I was too busy concentrating on everything.

The thing with rappelling is, it’s trickier than I would have guessed: Your arms and legs are doing 4 things independently of each other, all at the same time. Your right arm is under your butt trying to keep you from getting rope burn, your left hand is up by your chest working with a special lever that controls the speed of your descent, and with your legs you are periodically bouncing off the building and also adjusting for wind.

You’re doing this in windy conditions. In gloves. In the most uncomfortable harness you can imagine. While swallowing your fear. And somewhere in there you need to pause and drink in the experience!

I did stop a couple of times on my descent to enjoy the view but it was harder than expected so I just stuck with maintaining a good descent.

The wind was crazy, actually. It was fine until about halfway down, and then a big gust blew me off course and almost sent me spiralling out of control (which did happen to a couple other rappellers after me). Fortunately I was able to put out my one foot to catch myself against a window to keep from spinning. I believe that’s what the picture below shows: me with my right foot out as I tried to catch myself in a gust of wind.

(Side note: I mentioned earlier that I was disappointed that I had to go so early in the day. However, later that afternoon the wind picked up considerably and they had to postpone the rest of the event so it turned out to be a good thing that I went so early!)

And, as I neared the bottom, I could hear the cheers of a crowd that had gathered, and that was an amazing feeling. And by the time I got to the bottom and got untied, I felt like some kind of rockstar, as evidenced by this hilariously confident swagger…

And here I am after the event. The descent only took about 15 minutes but I was sweating and tired!

After The Event

I was surprised at how exhausted I was after the event. It’s a fast descent but also extremely active the whole time.

Immediately after the event I walked through the farmers market and then took a nearby walking tour of some historical buildings… and then went home and slept.

And then the next day I slept again.

And by the afternoon of the second day I felt stiff in my legs, arms, and back from a combination of the unusual activity and the tension of contorting against the wind in that harness.

But it was fun and I would do it again!

Summary

It was amazing!

A big theme in my life lately is breaking out of my comfort zone to discover new challenges and opportunities. Once you enjoy a bit of business success, it’s easy to get complacent in business and life, and to expect things to continue on in the same way. And this is one way that I push myself just a bit (even while doing something I’ve always wanted to do) to get momentarily uncomfortable and discover new experiences.

On August 19 2017 I raised $1065 for charity, crossed an item off my bucket list, and had a memorable experience that I would do again in a heartbeat!

Thank you to everyone who supported and encouraged me! It was something I’ll never forget.

 


Aaron Hoos, writerAaron Hoos is a writer, strategist, and investor who builds and optimizes profitable sales funnels. He’s the author of several books, including The Sales Funnel Bible.

I’m Going To Leap From The Top Of This Very Tall Building…

Scarth Street is one of my favorite places in Regina (the city I live in).

It’s pedestrian-friendly, a great mix of old and new architecture, and there’s plenty of places to eat, drink, relax, and enjoy the surroundings.

And at the head of the pedestrian-only section of Scarth Street is the McCallum Hill Tower Centre, a 2-tower complex pictured below. (Check it out in Google Earth)

Well, on August 19 I am going to jump off the one on the right.

It’s 22-storeys down.

But not a free-fall, fortunately! ;)

I’ll be rappelling down the side of the building to raise money in support of Easter Seals, a really cool organization that helps Canadians with disabilities live active lives.

If you want to learn more or donate, check out the link below:

http://donate.saskability.com/goto/aaronhoos

I’m pretty excited about it!

 


Aaron Hoos, writerAaron Hoos is a writer, strategist, and investor who builds and optimizes profitable sales funnels. He’s the author of several books, including The Sales Funnel Bible.