Copywriting Tip: Your Lead Magnet Should Have A Date In The Title

Aaron Hoos - Copywriting Tips

Got a lead magnet? Put a date in the title. It feels more timely, and that’s what your audience is looking for: a timely solution to their problem.

For example:

“The 13 Strategies That Are Working In 2019 To…”
“9 Ways That Marketers Are Using Copy In 2019…”
“The 6 Tools Every Entrepreneur Should Use In 2019 For…”

Yeah, you’ll have to update it now and then (but you should anyway).

(Hey! While you’re here, check out my other copywriting tips for persuasion secrets and psychology hacks to increase conversions.)

Copywriting Tip: Use Sentence-Case Subject Lines

Aaron Hoos - Copywriting Tips

While there are a few exceptions to this rule, sentence-case subject lines seem to be currently out-pulling title case subject lines or all-lower-case subject lines.

(Again, this varies in a few circumstances and for certain audiences but this is a good rule of thumb at the moment.)

(Hey! While you’re here, check out my other copywriting tips for persuasion secrets and psychology hacks to increase conversions.)

Many Businesses Talk About Their Avatars… But Few Consider THIS Factor

Aaron Hoos

Your Avatar. It’s the one person who represents your perfect customer—a single “stand-in” who is the generalized amalgamation of the qualities and characteristics that make up your best customers.

Among business owners, “Avatar” is a popular buzzword right now. Back in the day, before this word came into vogue, we were calling it the “target market” or asking “who is your perfect customer?

You’ll hear business experts talk about “identifying your Avatar”, which is an important thing to do, but it’s not really a new concept. Check out my other blog posts on this related topic:

Regardless of what we’re calling it, I’m immensely pleased to see business owners paying extra close attention to gaining this essential knowledge in their business, which helps them create a more effective and more profitable sales funnel.

Problem is, I think business owners are now overlooking one aspect of understanding this audience.

They spend a lot of time focusing on the demographic and psychographic qualities of their ideal customers and end up missing out on one critical piece of information...

themselves, and how THEY are perceived by their audience.

Think about your customers. Perhaps you have an Avatar developed for them. Great! But does your Avatar include how you are perceived by your customers?

The 3 Ways That Your Customers Are Watching You

I believe your customers are watching you in three ways. (And when I say “watching you” I mean: interacting with you and your business through your sales funnel’s marketing and sales steps.)

They’re watching you in three different ways, and you need to address each of these three ways throughout your funnel.

#1. Credibility. Credibility is the level of truthfulness, trustworthiness, and authority that you have in the eyes of your customers. You may think (or know) that you are trustworthy but do your customers believe it? What does your Avatar need to see and hear from you in order to find you to be a credible business to deal with? (Hint: in many cases, credibility needs to be given from other sources, such as qualifications, testimonials, results, or media appearances.)

#2. Aspiration. Aspiration is what your customers should feel when they look at you and your business. That is, they may not want to aspire to be like your or your business but they should aspire to have the life that they receive once they implement the product/service that you sell. What does your Avatar need to see and hear from you in order to aspire for the life they get after purchasing your product/service? (Hint: in personality-driven businesses, the customer should want to have your life/lifestyle; in non-personality-driven businesses, the customer should want a life/lifestyle that is similar to what they see in your marketing.)

#3. Value. Value is the return that your customers receive from the purchase they make (it could be measured in dollars but it may be measured in other ways too). Your products and services must deliver value to your customers for them to want to buy from you. What does your Avatar need to see and hear from you in order to perceive the value in what you are selling? (Hint: focus on emotional benefits backed up with measurable logic.)

Summary

I haven’t reinvented the wheel with this information. Rather, I’m highlighting how rarely I see this information dialed into Avatar development.

Often, creating an Avatar is about outlining the demographic and psychographic qualities of your ideal customer—which is an important thing to do—but you need to go further and consider how your ideal customers need to see and hear about your credibility, their aspiration in you, and the value they get from you.

So, the next time you update your avatar, make sure you’re looking at your business through their eyes to adjust your marketing to match what they need.

Copywriting Tip: Humans Are Messy Contradictions And You Have To Appease Them All

Aaron Hoos - Copywriting Tips

People are messy contradictions.

I hinted at this recently when I said that people want to feel both unique AND part of a group. But that’s not the only contradiction.

They are naturally drawn to those whose lives are together but they hate people who are too perfect.

They are sick of things that are old and want something new, yet don’t like anything new.

They want to be told what to do yet don’t want to be told what to do.

They want to totally go all-in on something but don’t want to put all their eggs in a basket.

The list goes on and on.

The challenge of the copywriter is this: understand the messy contradictions and write to appease all of them.

No problem, right?

(Hey! While you’re here, check out my other copywriting tips for persuasion secrets and psychology hacks to increase conversions.)

Copywriting Tip: Eliminate The Risk Of Embarrassment

Aaron Hoos - Copywriting Tips

You might think that your prospects’ biggest risks are that they’ll lose money or your solution won’t work for them. Those are risks but not the biggest one.

The biggest risk your audience faces is the risk that they will be embarrassed by buying your solution.

We care very much about what other people think of us and even though your prospect might be experiencing a problem that others know about, they face an even bigger risk that the solution could embarrass them further.

They’ve come to grips with the fact people know they have a problem. Your copy needs to assure them that their family and friends will be astounded at the transformation and will wonder how it occurred.

(Hey! While you’re here, check out my other copywriting tips for persuasion secrets and psychology hacks to increase conversions.)