Introduction to the Business Diamond Framework

The Business Diamond Framework&trade is a tool I’ve created in the past couple of years to help businesses achieve profitable growth. From time to time, you’ll read about the Framework and how you can apply it to your business.

The Business Diamond Framework™ started life as a way for me to quickly understand my clients’ marketplace, goals, and needs so that I could write for them more effectively. But later, it became a tool that helped businesses to learn more about themselves, to develop competitor-defying innovation, and to implement strategy effectively.

Here’s why it’s relevant: Businesses want to grow but a growth path is not clearly laid out for them. They need to create strategy but which strategy to choose? There are a multitude of strategic development tools out there, but which ones are the right ones?

That’s what the Business Diamond Framework™ solves. The Framework combines two things:

  • A new way to think about a business
  • A methodology

Favorite commercials: The most interesting man in the world

My favorite commercials right now are for Dos Equiis. “The Most Interesting Man in the World” is a brilliant series and have done what plenty of other marketing has failed to do: Entice me to buy their product. The beer is decent (I’ve tasted better, I’ve tasted worse) and I have no illusions about actually becoming interesting, but the commercials entertain and — more importantly — the stick. When I’m at the beer store I see Dos Equis, I laugh at the memory of the commercial, and I buy the product.

Google Trends: (mis)fortune teller

I was in Google Trends the other day, doing some research for a client. On a whim, I decided to also see the search trend for “recession”. What an interesting find! Here is Google’s Trend graph:

aaronhoos_googletrends_recession

At first glance, it’s shocking to see how much the search volume and news references have grown. It’s shocking, but not a huge surprise: the recession is bad but the badness is stoked like a fire by the media.

But there’s something I find even more fascinating: Look at the first quarter of 2007. Recession searching spiked there. By today’s standards it wasn’t much, but compared to the amount that it was searched prior to that, it was huge. If someone had been paying attention, they would have had almost an entire year of warning before the through-the-roof spike in the beginning of 2008. Time to sell stocks, short stocks, lock in customers, and reduce inventory.